Madison River Fishing Report

Getting Buggy On The Madison

Green up is a really special time on the Madison. In a valley that receives only 12-14 inches of rainfall annually, and most of that coming in March and April, any moisture is good moisture to help sustain our rivers through the dry summer months. And it brings a beautiful green blanket to the valley. We’ve been very fortunate this winter and spring in that regard.

Rising Tides

I think it's safe to say we're starting to see signs of runoff coming our way. The Yellowstone is already off color, and the Madison is creeping up higher and higher with each passing week. Oftentimes these conditions spook anglers off, but for those who aren't intimidated, it's a fishy time of year. This week we've got a report from the one and only Will Connoly, who probably fishes more than all of us, and certainly has as much passion about fly fishing as anyone I know.

Got Midges?

No winter lasts forever, and no Spring skips a turn. Spring in in full swing here in Ennis. Midges are buzzing in droves along the banks, geese are nesting on virtually every island, the pelicans have found the valley again arriving back from warmer climes, and just this week I saw ospreys returning to the river. From a close encounter I had (pictured below), it doesn't look like they need a fishing report, huh? Life on the Madison, in the middle of America's Serengeti, is a pretty spectacular place to be in Spring. 

Chubby Nation

This week’s report comes from our very own Borden Porter. Borden hails from Richmond, Virginia via the University of Alabama. Roll Tide. For those of you who don’t know Borden, his journey to Montana began a lot like the rest of us, by loading up his belongings and headed west for the hunting and fishing and ended up staying put.

Borden is quite the fish head as evidenced in the photos below. He got out a few times this week and here’s what he experienced in his own southern narrative...

Spring Time Is The Best Time

This week was definitely more representative of spring than some of the balmier weeks we’ve had thus far. A good mix of snow, rain, beautiful sun, and gale force Chinook winds all packed in 7 days. Big changes are occurring in the river right now. For example, at the beginning of March we were averaging water temps around 36 degrees Fahrenheit or so at Varney. By today, the mercury has already grazed the 48 degree mark twice! That explains the explosion in subsurface bug life.

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